Why (and How) to use a Daily Sales Planner

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Why you should use a daily sales planner

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Even though I have a great sales CRM platform available to me, I still like putting a pen to a pad (or planner) on the first day of every month. Writing down my monthly sales goals, including my monthly sales target, my weekly sales target, the times I will schedule the necessary appointments each day, and the “top prospects” of the month.

By defining my sales objectives and creating those weekly and monthly sales targets on the first day of every month, I am setting myself up for a successful month.

Once you decide on what your sales targets are, you will be able to decide the steps and strategy to get there.

I also plan in a time at the end of each week to assess how the week went. Did you hit your sales target for the week?  

What worked in helping you reach that target, or …

What went wrong and how can you correct it to get back on track. So that you can quickly identify the gaps you need to fill to reach your target.

This weekly planning and accountability using a daily sales planner helps you to know exactly how much money you will be putting into your bank account every pay period.

Within my main sales target, I look at the breakdown of how much I need to sell of a certain product or service.

Your sales mix.  Widget A and Widget B.  Maybe your commission or bonus is higher on Widget B. You want to make sure you are keeping track of that breakdown as well to insure you can maximize your income.

I break that down even further. Not into a dollar amount I need to sell, but into how many actual widgets I need to sell to reach my sales goals.  For example, would you rather have to sell $50,000 or 10 widgets?

The more attainable your goal feels to you, the more likely you are to achieve it!

Your personal objectives and goals should be clear and measurable. With very specific numbers, and specific dates that you will reach those goals by.  For example, I will sell 13 widgets a week.

Once you have that target in place, work backwards to create the exact strategy for how you will reach that goal.

How many widgets do you sell to each customer? (your average sale amount).

How many customers do you close on average?  One in two (50% close ratio), a two in three (67% close ration), one in three (a 33% close ratio).

From here you can determine how many sales appointments you will need to create the sales opportunities you need.

And, in simple form, your monthly and daily sales plan is created.  

First ,state your sales objectives. Then decide your strategic direction on how you will reach your objective, with daily and weekly monitoring of your actions and results.

When you have a great daily sales planner to help you, it’s magic.  

A great daily sales planner will help you put the systems in place and help you monitor your progress, but you have to do the work . The magic is you. And the time you spend at the end of every day, week, or month to strategically plan out what you need to do to hit your sales goals.  

A great sales planner just helps to make it your life easier by giving you a place to refer back to to hold yourself accountable so that you can quickly correct your course instead of missing your targets.

I am a big believer in the power of the written word, or in this case, plan.

Take time at the end of each week to schedule in the time for the next week. Time you will need to prospect, run appointments, and process agreements.

If you don’t plan in time for each of those three activities, one or more of them won’t get done.  The more planned-out your week is, the more urgency you will feel in the need to stay on track to complete your important sales activities.

I like to “batch” activities throughout the day. It’s based on how many activities I need to include. I also like to work the type of activity according to what my energy levels are during certain times of the day, scheduling the least demanding activities during my lowest energy level times (like right after lunch).

What would your perfect “sales day” look like,

and what would you include so that you could have repeatable success every day?

Mine would include 3 appointments a day, with 2 ½ hours in between appointments. That way I will have enough time with each prospect without either of us feeling rushed.

So, let’s block out appointment time of 10, 1 and 3:30.  If I know an appointment needs more time before I meet with them, I will allow two appointment slots with them.  Before you do that, make sure that the prospect is worth two appointment slots.   

Decide on your agenda for each meeting and the expected action you want your prospect to take at the end of the meeting.

I also know that I need about two hours of prospecting time a day. One hour to reach out to new prospects. Another hour to follow up with prospects that have not bought from me yet.  Your schedule may be a little different, but probably similar.  

I like to do my prospecting first thing in the morning. 9 to 10 am, and then again later in the afternoon at 4 or 5 pm. I’m a night person, and my energy levels are just getting started at 5.  I have found that this is also the time when more people will respond to me faster.

By putting this prospecting time in my daily sales planner, it is like setting another appointment. But this one is with myself, to do the things I know are important to consistently reach my weekly and monthly sales targets.

When you “break” these appointments with yourself, you end up losing and trying to play catch-up. Not what you want to do be doing at the end of the month.

Once you have the main outline in place, you can fill in the who and why. 

Having an organized strategy and goals with a plan on how to reach your goals will make it easier to hold yourself accountable and stick to the daily plan.

You should have a 7- day, and a 30-day sales plan. A good sales planner should have enough room to keep track of up to 90 days at a time.

How and when should you create these sales plans? 

The good news is, that with a hard-copy daily sales planner in front of you, it’s easy.  Once you make it a habit to keep up with this planning, it will become a second nature to you, just like in the Unconscious Doer Stage Four of the Sales Transformation Road-map System.

For the 30-day sales plan, I set it on the first day of each month.

In this plan, I have my monthly and weekly sales target numbers. I include my top 10 target prospects for the month, and 3 specific actions to take every day to get the results I want.

List the specific sales you plan on closing during the month. Then write down the things you need to do to close those sales and process the business.

I find that my monthly top 10 clients will account for 75% of my monthly goal. Secondary clients – the new clients that are just entering your sales pipeline, will fill in the rest.

For the 7-day, or weekly, sales plan, you want to have your plan in place for the next week before you end your week on Friday. 

It is incredibly motivating to have a plan, and appointments, in place for the next week. It makes you actually look forward to going to work on a Monday morning!

Transfer the things you didn’t complete last week to the next week – only if it is something that will lead to a sale.

And I review my day before I leave, every day.  I update the following day with what I need to do and when. Then I close the planner for the night.  

When you start the next day, open the planner, and your sales CRM program, and dig in.

Ultimately, your discipline and your decision to follow your sales plan is your key to success.

Click here for 15% off on the sales planner that I prefer!

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  1. Pingback: How to Stay Motivated In Your Sales | Made Simple Business Learning

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